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MINI Video Input

mini

As many of you who follow Motoringfile closely already know, I happen to have an OEM backup camera installed in my MINI (see: MINI Rear Camera Review). The rear-view camera produces such a nice image on the navigation display that it started me thinking about if it would be possible to use the backup camera as a video input for other video sources. It would be really cool to be able to play DVD movies (and possibly even play PS2 games) on the built-in navigation screen in my MINI. Well, after exploring the wiring diagram for the backup camera installation kit, it appears that there are indeed a couple of video inputs that can easily be tapped into (see: MINI Rear Camera Retrofit Kit Installation Instructions).

The backup camera installation kit is comprised of the rear-view camera, a small control module, a video switchbox, and the wiring harnesses used to hook it all up. The installation kit is broken up into two components; The rear-view camera parts kit ( P/N: 66 21 0 392 370 – comprised of the rear-view camera, control module, and wiring harness for the camera) and the additional switchbox parts kit (P/N: 66 21 0 303 085 – comprised of the video switchbox and the wiring harness used for hooking the switchbox up to the navigation computer). As luck would have it, it turns out that the video switchbox has two sets of video inputs that can indeed be used to create an external video input feed for your MINI.

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One set of the video inputs on the switchbox is used for the rear-view camera and the other set is used for a front-view camera. The really cool part is that if you don’t have/want the rear-view camera, you can purchase just the video switchbox kit for around $200 and use it to hookup a switched video input feed in your MINI. The only down-fall to doing it this way is that, for technical reasons, you’ll be forced to use the front-view camera’s video input feed and it automatically switches off the video signal once the car is moving faster than 10 KPH (this is a typical safety feature that BMW uses to prevent you from watching the video while driving your car). If however, you happen to have the complete rear-view camera kit, then you can hook into the rear-view camera’s video feed and get video-in-motion. Since the rear-view camera is designed to work while the car is in motion, it doesn’t automatically force the video feed to turn off at above 10 KPH.

Of course the details on hooking up the video input are a bit beyond the scope of this article. However, if you’re interested, I’d be more than happy to share my findings with you and tell you exactly what to do in order to hook is all up. Either send me an e-mail, or better yet, post a comment here and I’ll do my best to try and explain it all for you. Suffice it to say that it’s quite easy to hook up if you have basic wiring skills.

As you can see from the following photos, the result is quite spectacular. I was able to setup the video input in my MINI and hook up one of the new thin-line PS2 game consoles to it. The new thin PS2 is absolutely amazing! It’s super small size allows you to hide the entire unit within the MINI’s glove box. With the simple flick of a switch (also hidden within the glove box) I can now watch DVD movies and play PS2 games right from my MINI’s built-in navigation display:

In order to provide sound for your video input, you’ll also need to have an audio input as well. This is easily done by simply installing one of the $40 OEM MINI AUX cables (P/N: 82 11 0 153 367) and then hooking up your audio source to it (e.g. the audio output from the PS2 console in my case). Once installed, your factory MINI radio will have a new “AUX” mode (accessed via the “MODE” button on the radio) and this is the mode that will be used to play the audio for your video input. In the following photo, you can see the OEM AUX input jack that I installed in the upper right-hand corner of the glove box (you can also see the small switch in the left-hand corner that switches the navigation computer display over to showing the video input signal):

Lastly, if you’re going to use a PS2 console, as I did, then you’ll also need a power inverter in order to convert the DC voltage in your MINI over to the AC voltage that’s required by the game console. These units are available for around $40-$60 in most electronic shops (such as Radio Shack, eBay, etc.). Just make sure that you get one that supplies enough continuous wattage to run whatever you’re going to be plugging into it (I believe that the PS2 console requires a minimum of 79 watts). I ended up getting a DC Power Supply Accessory Kit from Radio Shack (P/N: 22-540) for $6.99 and tying it into the 12 volt switched accessory jack located in the boot of my MINI. I then plugged a power inverter into the adapter kit’s 12 volt power supply socket and using it to power the PS2 game console:

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Written By: Mike

  • Kurt Gillespie

    Damn… that makes one sweet, pimped out electronics setup… I likie…

    Any word on whether you can retrofit nav stock nav system into a car that was built without it? with the video input, you could put a mac mini in the glove compartment and do anything from movies and on…

  • Phil aka Greatbear

    Finally someone does a bit of digging into this kit to see what it is capable of beyond the rear camera view. I’ve been intrigued by the kit not simply for the camera (which is better than the usual PDC audible signal IMO) but as a ‘video aux input’ to make use of the display but not at the cost of a ‘NavTV’ setup. You’ve answered my question, and I will look more into getting the camera kit for it’s additional ‘benefits’.

    Thanks!

  • ChrisW

    One more person to avoid on the roads….

  • http://motoringfile.com Gabe

    Obviously Mike isn’t planning on whipping out GT4 while going 70mph. I’d give him a little credit.

  • Rob Livesey

    It’s just a shame that the sat nav still looks like a square peg in a round hole.

  • Frank

    Very neat setup! But please use it responsibly and not while driving..

  • http://www.detailingconcepts.com matt

    MINI’s can get 70mpg?

  • RB

    Nice tech piece BUT……I can’t for the life of me see what the use of this would be?! I understand if you have kids and them having a set up in the rear seats to keep the little bastar_s quiet but playing games and watching videos in your car, HUH?

    Are you homeless?

    Marshall McLuhan are you out there?

    I mean it was hard enough to take pix during my drive from Boston to LA let alone play or watch videos.

    Nice tech piece though, KUDOS.

  • 05DSMCS

    Only with this new video setup.

  • Mike (The Office Maven)

    Hi All,

    Thanks for the great comments. I’m very glad to hear that you like it (well, most of you anyway [grin]). For those of you who are worried about folks using it while driving, as I mentioned in the article, the easiest (and cheapest) way of hooking it up actually locks out video-in-motion. The video feed automatically switches itself off when you go faster than 10 KPH. This is a built-in BMW safety measure.

    Personally, I think that it’s pretty cool, but I’m not sure how much it will ever get used in my own car (except for maybe the occasional cross-country trip where my wife could watch a movie while I drive, or where I play a game while I’m waiting for her to come out of a store, etc.). I really only did it just to see if it could be done. The PS2 was a gift and the AUX input I was going to install anyway. Thus, the install only cost the price of the power inverter and a couple of relays (i.e. I had nothing to lose). The results are great though and so I thought that I’d pass my findings along to other MINI owners who might be interested.

    For those of you who are interested, there’s a bit more discussion going on about this in the following thread over on NAM:

    TV/Video On Nav Install Pictures Help

    Enjoy…

  • RB

    Gabe, I think CW has a valid comment.

    Maybe this gentleman lives in the OUTBACK and has miles upon miles of empty roads to drive but here in LA LA Land most people have a hard enough time using their mobiles and driving.

    So if you don’t have a back seat full of kids and your not homeless what is the other purpose for this other than watching videos while your driving….maybe you can ‘splain it to us concerned drivers who need all their attention dealing with bad drivers and cell users?

    I do give the man credit for his technical prowess it’s a nice set up…… but why?

    RB

  • http://www.jwardell.com/mini/ Josh Wardell

    Great installation. Do you have a photo of the video switchbox and where it is placed?

  • http://www.jonodove.com Jono

    Nice work Mike, I don’t have the navi setup but I really like what you’ve done with yours. While I understand where RB is coming from, he’s a little strong winded in his delivery. IMHO. Either way, nice job and keep up the good work!

    Cheers

  • rbm4

    If you live in the Seattle area and have to commute to work on the ferry from Bremerton, this would be the perfect mod. total travel time (waiting for the ferry + trip across) is about 1.5 hours.

  • MINI4cathy

    This would be the cleanest way to hook up a Mac Mini or PC — no need for an added monitor. Two questions:

    1. What is the video input spec to use for a computer or game console that will feed into the input?

    2. How many things can we hook up in one MINI (video input, ICE-Link or other iPod interface, phone cradle/Bluetooth)? I might want to have them all.

  • BrantV

    Why?

    Howabout something to do while waiting for your friends to meet you someplace? Or those following to catch up :-)

    Would be nice to have at an In-n-Out, or as we affectionatly call it In-n-n-n-n-n-n-n-n-n-n-wait-be-patient-n-n-n-Out. I never understood the need either until recently. Perhaps I should finder faster fast food.

  • Mike (The Office Maven)

    Josh,

    I’m afraid that I didn’t get any shots of the switchbox installed in the car. There’s not much to look at anyway as it’s just a small silver colored box that hooks into the nav computer via a factory-style harness.

    However, if you download the backup camera installation PDF (there’s a download link for it in the article), it has drawings of the switchbox as well as the wiring diagram. This is what I used to figure it all out.

    I also have a similar set of installation instructions for the front-view camera (except it’s all in German I’m afraid) and that’s what I used to figure out the other set of video input feeds on the switchbox. If you have any questions about what pins I used, etc. please feel free to ask and I’ll do my best to try and give you an answer.

  • Mike (The Office Maven)

    What is the video input spec to use for a computer or game console that will feed into the input?

    It’s just a standard video input that you hook up a RCA-style video cable to (I used a 3′ shielded cable from RadioShack – P/N: 42-2370A $2.99). Thus, as long as your computer (video camera, game console, mobile phone, etc.) has a standard video-out jack/plug, then you’ll be able to hook it up to this video input feed. If you have more than one video source that you want to hook up, then you’ll need to use an A/B video switch.

    How many things can we hook up in one MINI (video input, ICE-Link or other iPod interface, phone cradle/Bluetooth)? I might want to have them all.

    As far as I know, you should be able to hook them all up together if you wanted to. Most of the plugs (radio plugs, nav computer plugs, etc.) will simply daisy chain on top of one another and so you can keep plugging in more harnesses if you want/need to.

    Note that many of the items use different hook-up/plug-in locations (e.g. some hook-up/plug-in at the radio, some at the nav computer, some at the CD changer connector in the boot, etc.). This is why many of the items you’ve mentioned will work just fine together.

    I hope this helps some…

  • Mike (The Office Maven)

    BTW, it looks like the article’s missing the photo that shows the AUX input and the video switch in the glove box. Here’s a link to it just in case anyone wants to see it:

    AUX Input In MINI’s Glove Box

  • ChrisW

    “….except for maybe the occasional cross-country trip where my wife could watch a movie while I drive….”

    Yikes! You’re telling me you could keep your full attention on the road while a fantastic movie is playing mere degrees from your forward-focused field of vision? Just reaching for the window switch in the MINI is more distraction from the road than I can handle half the time. Maybe it’s just me…

    I’m not picking on you specifically (honestly, so don’t take it the wrong way), but on the whole concept of video-related anything installed in cars within view of the driver (except for back-up cameras I suppose). If something like this becomes mainstream someday, my MINI will be reserved for the track and I’ll be taking the train everywhere. Hmmm, too bad mass transit in Utah leaves much to be desired…

  • MINI4cathy

    Please do provide a writeup of the pins you used, how you modded the video cable, and the video settings. If it’s too big for a comment, would you email me a copy?

    Also, from reading the Backup Camera PDF, the rear-camera kit turns on automatically and takes over the screen when the car is put in reverse, and turns off within 5 seconds after you shift out of reverse. How would you change the wiring so that this can be bypassed and switched manually? That way a button could quickly toggle between the normal Nav screen view and the video input.

    I feel a woohoo coming on here…

  • Cruzin Chris

    While driving from FL to TX on I-10 I came to a complete stop due to traffic and sat there for about 15 mins with out moving. I then went into my luggage and got out my portable DVD player and sat it up on the dash and watched it. I ended up sitting in that one spot for 1 hour 10 mins before traffic started to move again. I didn’t mind the wait, just needed some popcorn.

  • Mike (The Office Maven)

    ChrisW, RB, etc.,

    I’m not going to get into a long drug out battle with you guys over this one. If you don’t like it (or don’t agree with it), then that’s you prerogative. I respect your decision. However, just because you don’t like/want it doesn’t mean that others won’t. This is America after all, and the last time I checked, it was still a free country.

    I’m not offended by anything being said here, I just wanted to explain why you guys aren’t going to get a response (other than this one that is [grin]) from me. I respect your opinions so please respect mine too.

  • Abbett

    Mike,

    In America you are not free to do as you please, it is illegal to have a video display for movies or games that is visable to the driver.

  • Abbett

    Clarification

    Illegal while the vehicle is in motion.

  • http://1bystander.blogspot.com/ Radiationman

    I think this is one of those things that you do less for the practicality of it than for the ability to say “Hey look what I did!”

    Isn’t that the type of thing that wins awards at car shows?

    You did a good job, it’s a neat setup, but I’ll echo a few other comments… Please use your new found powers responsibly ;)

  • RB

    I have never been accused of being meek in anything I do and I did give the man KUDOS for what he did and I would defend his right to do what he did it’s just I don’t get it.

    NICE JOB MIKE, It looks very nice.

  • Mike (The Office Maven)

    Come on guys… I’m not advocating that folks use it with video-in-motion (I only mentioned that it can be installed that way and it just so happens that that’s the way I hooked mine up as that’s how I first figured out how to make it all work). In fact, I’d much rather see folks hook it up with the BMW enforced 10 KPH shutoff in place (besides that, it’s cheaper and easier to setup it that way anyway). All of this really is off-topic from what I originally did the write-up for in the first place so can’t we just move on now? I get the fact that some folks don’t like it. Enough said.

    BTW, thanks for your comments RB.

  • Abbett

    I understand Mike, I was just “giving you the business” that our Country is not so free.

  • KevinR

    Great write-up, as always! BTW, you have mail.

  • MiniMonkey

    I have been waiting for this info. Thanks for the great write up.

  • Mike (The Office Maven)
    Please do provide a writeup of the pins you used, how you modded the video cable, and the video settings. If it’s too big for a comment, would you email me a copy?

    I’ll see if I can put together a small document that shows how to hook it up using the OEM video switchbox.

    Also, from reading the Backup Camera PDF, the rear-camera kit turns on automatically and takes over the screen when the car is put in reverse, and turns off within 5 seconds after you shift out of reverse. How would you change the wiring so that this can be bypassed and switched manually? That way a button could quickly toggle between the normal Nav screen view and the video input.

    This was one of the big dilemmas that I faced when trying to figure things out. I didn’t want to give up my rear-view camera, and yet I still wanted to be able to hook up an auxiliary video input. I ended up splitting/switching the signal using a couple of relays. Basically what happens is, when I flip the video switch in the glove box, it tricks the system into thinking that the rear-view camera needs to be turned on. I then feed in my aux video input signal in place of the one that would normally be coming in from the rear-view camera (via a relay). When you switch the car into reverse, the rear-view camera turns on automatically as it normally would (i.e. the rear-view camera’s signal takes precedence over the aux video input signal). It will all become much clearer once you see how I wired it up. For starters you should take a look at the wiring diagram in the rear-view camera installation instructions as it will familiarize you with the switchbox and the other components.

    Also, please note that it’s MUCH easier just to hook up the aux video input in place of the front-view camera instead. This way you don’t have to mess around with switching two video signals and the installation is much cleaner and much easier (i.e. no extra relays are required, but you also won’t have video-in-motion either). The OEM video switchbox is setup to work with both the rear-view camera and the front-view camera at the same time. If you’re not planning on hooking up the front-view camera, then you can simply hook into that part of the OEM video switchbox instead. All that’s required are a few pins that go into the video switchbox’s wiring harness plug (they’re the exact same pins that go into the nav computer plugs and the AUX plug that plugs into the back of the radio as well). These can be purchased (for cheap) from your local MINI dealer although I don’t have a part number on them I’m afraid.

  • Jack Wolfe

    I agree with many of the commments nice tech work but I to am concerned that we do not need more distractions. I know you all mean well but I am sure it would be easy to have it on and the background with the intent not to watch but you know how it goes.

    I do confess I used to drive Truck Cross country coast to coast and listen to the radio, talk on the CB and read novels going down the road

    I was lucky and not to bright then, now I am more concerned then ever that we do more business in the car then we do driving

  • Freudeam Fahren

    That’s really outstanding. KUDOS!!! But then where would I put my gun? Does anybody have any suggestions on any alternate locations for my 9?

  • https://secure.mawebcenters.com/wc/sd_websites/spirit2/ O(=^=)O Capn

    I don’t know, If my wife was watching “Steel magnolias” or “How Stella got her groove back” it wouldn’t be a distraction to me. But on the other hand, just listening to it might be enough to put me asleep at the wheel. “Danger Will Robinson! Danger!”

  • http://www.newministuff.com Mike Wildman

    can I say a big WELL DONE to Mike, really interesting stuff

  • Mike (The Office Maven)

    Hi All,

    Okay, for those that are interested here’s a photo of a wiring diagram I drew up for hooking up the AUX video input using the OEM video switchbox:

    Wiring Diagram For AUX Video Input Using OEM Video Switchbox – No Video-In-Motion!

    Sorry for the poor quality (and my bad penmanship), I don’t have a scanner, but you should be able to see how it’s done. Basically it goes like this:

    1. Pin 10 of the blue P1 connector that’s hooked to the switchbox (Q) goes to the violet/white wire coming out of the Bordeaux (i.e. wine) colored connector on the back of the nav computer (which is located under the passenger’s seat on the hardtops and under the driver’s seat on the convertibles) AND to your video switch (mine is located in the glove box).

    2. Pin 7 goes to the other end of your video switch (again, mine is located in the glove box).

    3. Pin 20 goes to the X101086 connector block. If you pull up the door sill cover (on the passenger’s side) you’ll see a few of these X-type connectors hooked to the body of the car. The X10186 connector is one of the smallest ones and it has a bunch of yellow/green wires connected to it. I believe that this is where the switchbox picks up the “in motion” signal for the car (and no it won’t work if you bypass it as I’ve already tried). You can buy the required connector pins used for attaching your wire to the X-type connector from your local dealer (you’ll need a few of them anyway). Note that the X10186 connector (at least on the hardtops) is found right close to the nav computer. Simply run a short wire from the connector into the nav computer housing and hook it up.

    4. Pin 21 is the video+ input and pin 8 is the video- input. I simply connected these to a 3′ shielded video cable. This is the input source for your video signal (from the PS2 or whatever). Note that on a male/female RCA connector, the positive (+) wire is the shielded one that runs up the center of the cable and the negative (-) wire is what’s wrapped around the outside of the center one. Don’t get these confused when you hook them up.

    That’s all there is to it. Turn on the ignition, flip the switch, and as long as you’re going slower than 10 KPH you should see your aux video input signal appear on the factory nav display.

    The other connection method is much more involved (due to the relays required) and so I’ll write that one up separately.

    Enjoy…

  • https://secure.mawebcenters.com/wc/sd_websites/spirit2/ O(=^=)O Capn

    Outstanding Thanks! Look forward to the other version, too.

  • MiniMonkey

    WHat does flipping the switch going slower than 10 KPH have to do with it? Did I miss something?

  • MiniMonkey

    Ooops. I got it now. What’s the point then? If you don’t want a rear camera and just want to feed video (and want it while your moving)… there must be a simple cost effective way.

  • Mike (The Office Maven)

    Of course you still mount/install the switchbox as indicated in step #8 of the rear-view camera’s installation PDF (although I used Velcro strips to mount mine as I didn’t want to drill holes into the nav computer’s case/cover just in case I want to remove the install later on), and you connect the switchbox via the O & P harnesses (e.g. the O1 & P1 connectors that come with the switchbox kit) as shown in step #9 (substituting the pins I’ve indicated in my drawing for the ones they use in theirs).

    I know that it sounds complicated, but it’s really very easy since it’s all just plug-in stuff. The only hard part of the entire install is removing the MINI’s interior trim in order to access the nav computer, etc.

  • Mike (The Office Maven)
    WHat does flipping the switch going slower than 10 KPH have to do with it? Did I miss something?
    Ooops. I got it now. What’s the point then? If you don’t want a rear camera and just want to feed video (and want it while your moving)… there must be a simple cost effective way.

    Flipping the switch turns on the aux video input feed as long as you are going slower than 10 KPH. If you go above that, the switchbox automatically switches back to the factory nav display, and when you drop back down below 10 KPH (assuming the switch is still in the on position), it will once again flip itself back to the aux video input feed.

    Obviously, you’re looking for video-in-motion. Thus, you’ll have to use the backup camera (as I can’t figure out how to make video-in-motion using the OEM switchbox work without it), or you’ll have to go with another solution. If you take a look at the NAM thread I pointed folks to in one of my earlier comments, I’ve listed at least three other switched video controllers for use in the MINI. They all sell for under $450 and some of them also allow video-in-motion. Most of them are a nicer solution than the OEM video switchbox, but none of them are as cheap.

    Again, for those who read MF and don’t like the idea of video-in-motion, please note that I am NOT suggesting that anyone hook their systems up like that. It’s your choice (and possibly your ticket if you get caught).

  • Sarah

    Great job Mike! Thanks for the great write-up!

  • Mike (The Office Maven)

    Hi All,

    Okay, here’s the other diagram that I drew up which allows you to use the OEM switchbox (and rear-view camera control module) as an aux video input with video-in-motion:

    Relay Wiring Diagram For AUX Video Input Using OEM Video Switchbox & Control Module – With Video-In-Motion!

    Note that you MUST have the OEM rear-view camera installed in order for this to work. Since the rear-view camera is designed to work while the car is in-motion, you can simply trick the control module (which is part of the rear-view camera kit) into thinking that the car is in reverse (when it really isn’t) and then use the video input source for the rear-view camera as your aux video input feed instead. Since you’ll also want to use your rear-view camera, you’ll have to auto-switch the two video signals when appropriate (i.e. when the car is put into reverse). I’ve worked out a simple way of doing this using a couple of relays.

    One relay switches from the aux video input signal (e.g. your PS2, etc.) to the rear-view camera video input whenever the car is put into reverse (allowing your backup camera to still function properly). The other relay automatically switches the 12 volt “switching signal” going to the rear-view camera’s control module from our 12 volt switching signal (e.g. the switch located in the glove box that’s used to turn on the aux video input feed for the PS2, etc.) to the 12 volt reverse indicator feed signal whenever the car is put into reverse. Simply put, this allows you to trick the control module into thinking that the car is in reverse without having to actually put it in reverse (and have the reverse lights go on). We are forced to use the rear-view camera’s control module (if we want video-in-motion) as it converts the reverse indicator feed signal (RSF) into a different form of signal (RSFinv) that’s recognized by the switchbox.

    Anyway, my diagram/drawing assumes that you have the rear-view camera already installed in your MINI and that you have read the rear-view camera installation instructions (and wiring diagram) thoroughly.

    The first relay (that switches between the two video input signals) is installed within the nav computer’s case/cover in my car. The second relay (that switches between the control module’s +12 volt feed signals) is installed in the right-hand cubby hole in the boot of my car (i.e. right at the location where I tapped into the BL/GE reverse signal wire in my MINI’s standard wiring harness – picture “R50 1022 Z” in step #7 of the rear-view camera installation PDF). The relay is simply inserted in-between the control module and the BL/GE reverse signal wire (as indicated in my diagram).

    With this install, your factory nav system works as it normally would and the backup works as it normally would. However, when you flip the switch in the glove box to switch over to your aux video input feed, the nav display changes to your video input. If you put the car in reverse, the rear-view camera will display over your aux video input feed. Turning off the switch takes the display back to the factory nav display.

    It works great and you get video-in-motion! Be forewarned that it’s illegal in the U.S. to have video-in-motion. Thus, you can get a ticket if caught using it (or even worse; you may get into an accident while using it). However, I think that we’re all adults here and so I’m sure that you will all use the proper amount of discretion with your setups.

    Enjoy…

  • MINI4cathy

    I think I’ve got it.

    You have added a switch that allows you to turn on the video feed as though the car is in reverse.

    The rear-view camera and the aux video are connected to a RadioShack relay, which then connects to the video-in connector. You’re using the reverse detection line (RSF) to control whether the camera or aux video is fed through the relay. The aux video is fed thru unless the car is in reverse. While in reverse, the camera is is fed thru.

    A nice touch is that the reverse detection line can still turn on the video feed. So even if you haven’t turned on the video feed, when the car is in reverse, the video feed is enabled and the rear-view camera is fed throu.

    Woohoo! This is the way to go.

    What video connector do you use on your PS2, and what kind of video signal does it send?

  • MINI4cathy

    By the way, if/when I use this solution, I will have a Mac OS Widget covering the screen so there’s no video playing while underway. I’ll display caller info for the Bluetooth phone and Artist/Recording info for music playback.

  • RB

    WORD OF THE DAY………..Driversion

  • Mike (The Office Maven)
    I think I’ve got it.

    Excellent!

    You have added a switch that allows you to turn on the video feed as though the car is in reverse.

    Yes.

    The rear-view camera and the aux video are connected to a Radio Shack relay, which then connects to the video-in connector.

    Yes. Note that you could also try using a standard A/B video switch here instead of the relay if you are worried about degradation of the video signal. I couldn’t find an A/B video switch that was small enough to work with my setup and so I went with the relay instead. My video signal appears just fine using the relay.

    However, there is something a bit weird going on with the colors on the display, but I don’t think that has anything to do with the relay. Since the OEM video switchbox doesn’t have any way to adjust the color, you’re simply stuck with it like that I’m afraid (it’s not bad, but it is noticeable at times). Some of the other more expensive solutions I noted in the NAM topic that I referenced have color adjustments on the video switch. Thus, if you’re worried about this you can always try one of those video switches instead.

    You’re using the reverse detection line (RSF) to control whether the camera or aux video is fed through the relay.

    Yes. Via the second (5-terminal) relay that’s hooked up in the boot.

    The aux video is fed thru unless the car is in reverse. While in reverse, the camera is fed thru.

    Exactly!

    A nice touch is that the reverse detection line can still turn on the video feed. So even if you haven’t turned on the video feed, when the car is in reverse, the video feed is enabled and the rear-view camera is fed throu.

    Yhep!

    What video connector do you use on your PS2, and what kind of video signal does it send?

    I’m using the standard video/audio connector/cable that came with the PS2 unit. It ends in a yellow colored male RCA connector and I simply plug this directly into the video input feed as shown in my drawing (e.g. Radio Shack 42-7320A). I use a female-to-female adapter so that both of the male ends can connect (also purchased from Radio Shack for a couple of dollars).

    The PS2 video/audio connector/cable also ends in a separate left and right male RCA connector (one red and one white). I convert this into a standard 3.5 mm mini audio plug (via a cable that’s also available at Radio Shack for just a few dollars) and then I plug the mini plug into the 3.5 mm mini socket of the OEM AUX audio adapter that’s installed in my glove box. This plays the audio from the PS2 unit over my stock radio when I place it in AUX mode. Since I have the H/K system in my car, it really rocks. Movies such as Star Wars rattle the whole car. It’s just like sitting in the movie theater. [GRIN]

    I hope this helps some…

  • Mike (The Office Maven)
    WORD OF THE DAY………..Driversion

    If it bothers you so much why do you keep coming back to read what’s posted here? Just ignore it and go on with your life.

  • Mike (The Office Maven)
    By the way, if/when I use this solution, I will have a Mac OS Widget covering the screen so there’s no video playing while underway. I’ll display caller info for the Bluetooth phone and Artist/Recording info for music playback.

    Sounds pretty darn sweet to me. Please do post pics of your install once you get it all finished. I’d love to see them! :-)


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MINI Model Cheat Sheet

1st Gen MINI
R50: One & MC Hatch
R52: All 1st Gen MINI Convt.
R53: MCS Hatch
2nd Gen MINI
R55: Clubman
R56: Hatch
R57: Convertible
R58: Coupe
R59: Roadster
R60: MINI Crossover
R61: MINI Crossover Coupe
3rd Gen MINI
F54: Clubman
F55: Five Door Hatch
F56: Hatch
F57: Convertible
F60: MINI Crossover
F58: Traveller

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MotoringFile Reviews

Reviews:
'12 JCW Coupe
'11 Fiat 500 Sport
'11 Tesla Roaster 2.5 '11 Countryman Comparo
'11 Cooper S Hatch
'11 Countryman MCS (FWD)
'11 Countryman MC (auto)
'10 Mayfair MCS (auto)
'11 Countryman MCS (ALL4)
'10 MINI E
'10 Tesla Roadster Sport
'09 Cooper S Convertible
'09 JCW Hatch
'09 JCW Clubman
JCW Stage I vs JCW Stage II
'08 Clubman S (Auto)
1st Drive: '08 MINI Clubman
'08 Smart Fourtwo
Comparison: '08 BMW 135i
'06 R53 MCS vs '07 R56 MCS
'07 R56 JCW (Stage 1)
'07 MINI Cooper S Long Term
'07 BMW Z4 M Coupe
'07 MINI Cooper & Cooper S
Audio: '07 MC/MCS at the Track
'06 JCW GP Long term
Reader Review: JCW GP
'06 JCW Cooper S Long Term
Comparison: '06 Lotus Elise
Comparison: '06 Mazda MX5
Comparison: '06 UK Focus ST
Comparison: '06 Civic Si
Comparison: '04 TVR T350
Comparison: '06 Nissan 350z
Comparison: '06 VW GTI w/DSG
Podcast: Cooper S Auto
Podcast: BMW 325i
Podcast: JCW MC Soundkit
'04 JCW MINI Cooper Tuning Kit
'05 MCS: One Month Review
'05 MCS Auto
'05 JCW S 1st Drive
'05 MINI Cooper
'05 MCS Conv. Long Term
'05 MINI Cooper S
'05 MCS Cabrio 1st Drive
'04 JCW MCS First Drive
'04 MC w/JCW Tuning Kit
BMW M3 SMG Vs. MCS
'04 MINI Cooper CVT
'02 MCS 3 year Review
Autocrossing the MINI Range


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