Logo



MF Review: MINI Countryman Cooper S (manual)

Gabe in the MINI Countryman

We’ve reviewed the Countryman twice so far taking the ALL4 Cooper S to the track and the Cooper automatic to the backroads of Kansas. Today topped them all (in miles driven) with a 500 miles jaunt across the Kansas two-lane highway. Where yesterday we had fantastic twisties and elevation changes (yes in Kansas) today it was all about the miles and high speed.

The Countryman’s slightly slower steering and better on center control easily make it the best MINI on the highway I’ve ever driven. At speeds over 100 mph the R60 has more of a BMW feel than what you’d expect to find in an R53 or R56 (and that’s a good thing in this case). The wheelbase helps but it’s the steering and wider track that must be credited with giving this car a better presence on the highway. And sitting a little higher for better visibility doesn’t hurt either in making this the ultimate road trip MINI when you’re dodging 18 wheelers.

Gabe in the MINI Countryman

The Cooper S features the exact same drivetrain as the 2011 R56 MCS. Output is 181 hp and features variable valve timing that gives the powerplant better mid-range. The engine doesn’t feel stressed by the extra weight but it does feel around a second slower than the new 2011 LCI Cooper S. I’d guess low 7s 0-60.

The biggest upgrade on the transmission side is the entirely new clutch that is now self adjusting that gives you more consistent pedal feel. That combined with a new dual mass flywheel (on all Cooper S models) and carbon shift cables gives the MCS more feel and better longevity.

Gabe in the MINI Countryman

Ok let’s get past the technical information. What you really want to know is what the Countryman S is like to drive and live with. As I mentioned yesterday the R60 does an surprisingly good job feeling like a MINI. It is nimble with progressive steering feel and body control. And yes it’ll rotate in corners if pushed. The R60 I drove today had the optional sports suspension with 18″ wheels and performance tires. The car felt more buttoned down than the non-sport Cooper and still had obvious body roll in tight corners. Yes it’s a tall crossover, you’ll never forget that when pushing it to the limit in corners. But everything feels progressive and the car can be hustled from corner to corner with plenty of confidence.

Our test car came with Pure Red on the outside and red accents throughout the interior. Pure red is almost tomato red with hints of orange – definitely different than what we’re used to seeing in Chili Red. Inside the red door and rail inserts give a splash of color in a few unexpected places. I can’t help but think the R5X generation of interior was just a warm-up for the Countryman. The design and the execution is so much more well thought-out.

Gabe in the MINI Countryman

The interior is full of the highest quality materials I’ve ever seen in a MINI with a few exceptions. Granted the car I drove was a pre-production unit so some of niggles should probably be forgiven. However I have to mention that the armrest wasn’t in the best working condition (the top wouldn’t close) and the cup holders have way too much tension in their springs. I was assured these and a few more of the little issues I found should be well sorted out by the time the car goes on sale to the public.

Otherwise the R60 was the picture of quality in every way. Built in Austria at the plant that has made some of BMW’s highest quality products, the R60 has a lot going for it and could quickly become known as the best quality MINI on the market.

Gabe in the MINI Countryman

In its entirety ALL4 adds 70kg (154 pounds) to the Countryman’s weight. That makes this Countryman likely the fastest 0-60 of all R60s. With less weight and less driveline loss the FWD Countryman Cooper S may just be the true enthusiasts choice. However I won’t know for sure until I drive both back to back on the track.

While the R60 MCS doesn’t have the eagerness of the R56 MCS, it has more than you could expect from a four door crossover. It’s fun to drive while mixing utility that we’ve never seen in the MINI family. It also has a look that nods to the MINI design language while creating something new and relevant in today’s marketplace. In fact it’s the look and size that surprise most people when they see the Countryman for the first time. It’s smaller than a four door Golf (just) and full of angles and buldges that create an aggressive look while maintaining the irreverence of the MINI design language.

Pricing will be released in early October and the MINI USA configurator should go live shortly thereafter. The first cars in the US should arrive at dealers as early as mid-January and could mostly be made up of Cooper and Cooper S ALL4 models based on what I’m hearing. And that’s a shame because this FWD Cooper S might just be the sweet spot of the model mix. Combining power with 160 lbs of weight savings this car feels the closest to the MINI many of us have in our driveway. In a word it’s fun. And there aren’t a lot of small crossovers that fit into that category.

The biggest upgrade on the transmission side is the entirely new clutch that is now self adjusting that gives you more consistent pedal feel. That combined with a new dual mass flywheel (on all Cooper S models) and carbon shift cables gives the MCS more feel and better longevity.

Gabe in the MINI Countryman

Ok let’s get past the technical information. What you really want to know is what the Countryman S is like to drive and live with. As I mentioned yesterday the R60 does an surprisingly good job feeling like a MINI. It is nimble with progressive steering feel and body control. And yes it’ll rotate in corners if pushed. The R60 I drove today had the optional sports suspension with 18″ wheels and performance tires. The car felt more buttoned down than the non-sport Cooper and still had obvious body roll in tight corners. Yes it’s a tall crossover, you’ll never forget that when pushing it to the limit in corners. But everything feels progressive and the car can be hustled from corner to corner with plenty of confidence.

Our test car came with Pure Red on the outside and red accents throughout the interior. Pure red is almost tomato red with hints of orange – definitely different than what we’re used to seeing in Chili Red. Inside the red door and rail inserts give a splash of color in a few unexpected places. I can’t help but think the R5X generation of interior was just a warm-up for the Countryman. The design and the execution is so much more well thought-out.

Gabe in the MINI Countryman

The interior is full of the highest quality materials I’ve ever seen in a MINI with a few exceptions. Granted the car I drove was a pre-production unit so some of niggles should probably be forgiven. However I have to mention that the armrest wasn’t in the best working condition (the top wouldn’t close) and the cup holders have way too much tension in their springs. I was assured these and a few more of the little issues I found should be well sorted out by the time the car goes on sale to the public.

Otherwise the R60 was the picture of quality in every way. Built in Austria at the plant that has made some of BMW’s highest quality products, the R60 has a lot going for it and could quickly become known as the best quality MINI on the market.

Gabe in the MINI Countryman

In its entirety ALL4 adds 70kg (154 pounds) to the Countryman’s weight. That makes this Countryman likely the fastest 0-60 of all R60s. With less weight and less driveline loss the FWD Countryman Cooper S may just be the true enthusiasts choice. However I won’t know for sure until I drive both back to back on the track.

While the R60 MCS doesn’t have the eagerness of the R56 MCS, it has more than you could expect from a four door crossover. It’s fun to drive while mixing utility that we’ve never seen in the MINI family. It also has a look that nods to the MINI design language while creating something new and relevant in today’s marketplace. In fact it’s the look and size that surprise most people when they see the Countryman for the first time. It’s smaller than a four door Golf (just) and full of angles and buldges that create an aggressive look while maintaining the irreverence of the MINI design language.

Pricing will be released in early October and the MINI USA configurator should go live shortly thereafter. The first cars in the US should arrive at dealers as early as mid-January and could mostly be made up of Cooper and Cooper S ALL4 models based on what I’m hearing. And that’s a shame because this FWD Cooper S might just be the sweet spot of the model mix. Combining power with 160 lbs of weight savings this car feels the closest to the MINI many of us have in our driveway. In a word it’s fun. And there aren’t a lot of small crossovers that fit into that category.

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...
Written By: Gabe

  • Chilly

    Thanks for the write-up Gabe, sounds like MINI has a real winner on their hands after all!

    I love that Pure Red colour – any idea if they will be available on the Cooper?

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1421557780 bavarian racing green

    …smaller than a four-door golf…awesome…

    …but I still need diesel option to buy…

  • Dusty S

    Thanks Gabe – I can’t wait to drive the car. Last Saturday for 4 hours here in Minneapolis, we had the pleasure of being able to see the R60 on display at MotorWerks. MINI owners got an invitation to look and sit in the car. I loved it and heard many high praises from all the MINI owners. I couldn’t believe how much room was in the car. I’m 5’10″, a guy 6’3″ got in the back seat while I was in the front, and we all sat comfortably. The materials used is very nice. I’m anxious to see how the R60 S 4All compares to the FWD for performance and fuel economy. Thanks.

  • rimtnbiker

    This is the model for me! I am coaxing a Volvo with 270,000 miles on the odo to last until at least February 2011. When may we actually see one locally in RI? and when can orders be placed. I am all IN!

  • CV

    Nice write ups, Gabe. It sounds like this may be the best version of the Countryman for me. I got to see and sit in the two on display at MTTS here in LA (and got my limited edition MTTS badge from DB). The Countryman is easier to get in and out of than a MC, especially (but not limited to) the rear seat. I also like the slightly higher driving position. While I was standing nearby, a lady walked up with a moderate-size white lab and he was able to fit in the back cargo area with the cargo cover removed. I think the Countryman’s exterior styling is more ‘bulldogish’ than the MC, and I like it. I suspect that the Countryman may be MINI’s best-selling model in the US, and they may have a hard time keeping up with demand unless the pricing gets crazy.

    I’ve been playing a little with the UK configurator ( http://www.mini.co.uk/ ), and have two notes: No British Racing Green or BRG2? This might be the first MINI model not available in that color. I know the WRC cars are going to be red/white, but still . . . And like others have said before me, I wish we could get the diesel.

  • MINIme

    I want to see one on 15s with a taller profile, all-terrain tire. Yeah, I know it is going to be sloppy in the twisties, but I want this to look more like an SUV. Gasp! Hope I didn’t make any purists throw up in their mouth.

  • Bor

    Gabe,

    any intention to do a MINI Connect/new Nav review any time soon ?

    thanks

  • rkw

    I hope you’ll do a comparison with the new Nissan Juke, one of the ugliest cars ever but it is a direct competitor to the Countryman and has some interesting aspects. Motoring Trend did a side by side comparison and chose the AWD Juke over the ALL4 Countryman because they liked the handling better. Motor Trend: 2011 Mini Countryman vs 2011 Nissan Juke Comparison

  • Ian F

    @ MINIme: Yeah, a little bit. ;-)

  • http://www.nathanielsalzman.com Nathaniel Salzman

    Jeez that Nissan Juke is ugly. It’s positively murdering the Nissan brand.

  • http://www.motoringfile.com/ Gabe

    The Juke and Countryman haven’t been tested back to back due to the Countryman not being available yet for those kind of tests. I think this is one writer from RT going off of his memory from both vehicle launches. I doubt a MCS with the sport suspension would be 2nd to the juke but we’ll have to verify that.

  • Brian

    Ouch,

    First Place: Nissan Juke As impractical as it looks, but freakishly fun on the streets. The Juke is no joke, but it will still leave you giggling.

    Second Place: Mini Countryman All4 Cuter than a Pug singing Batman, but a letdown when things get twisty. Looks like a Mini. Doesn’t drive like one.

  • Chris

    Gabe, the article states Juke and Countryman were tested back to back.

    “So we got the Juke and Mini together. It took place off the Mini’s German launch event, which meant no Motor Trend verified test-track performance numbers were possible, but we made sure to run them back to back on a good mix of delimited autobahn, fast country roads, twistier hill route and suburban schmoozing.”

  • Captain

    I think existing MCS/JCW owners/drivers may be the most critical on the performance/handling of this new variant.

    I like the way the Countryman looks and the 4 doors would work great with our 2 kids, etc.

    That said, ultimately it will be how the Countryman drives for me to pull the trigger. I am not going to hand over my keys for something that is a radical departure from our MCS experience unless it handles well and is powered adequately.

    I may be wrong, but given what has been written thus far, I will probably hold out to see what they do w/the JCW and/or Prodrive version even if it means waiting another year or two for a better package.

  • http://www.motoringfile.com/ Gabe

    Knowing the author and the magazine it’d like what I mentioned. Remember this is MT we’re talking about.

    Btw I can imagine any press has aa many miles behind the wheel of each variant at this point. So if you have questions ask away.

  • Jas

    Did they move mission control to the flash/hard drive of nav/mini connect or still on sd card in dash like the Camden? Also has Vinnie given any insight to the US release of that option?

  • Captain

    @Gabe – re:MT, roger that.

    The Nissan Juke (someone will officially coin it Puke on looks alone) brings back memories of the vaunted Pontiac Aztec for me, so I do not care how well it drives.

    Our MCS was serviced today and we need to go back in another 4 to 6 months for the 30k service, hopefully there will be a Countryman S to test drive by then.

  • that.guy

    “Self-adjusting clutch”? Yeah, I hate having to adjust the clutch on my R53. Whachu talkin bout Willis?

  • rkw

    The special thing about the Juke (besides its “unique” styling) is 4WD torque vectoring, a breakthrough in this price range. It’s a big reason why the large, heavy BMW X6 handles better than it ought to, and no doubt what gave it the edge in the review.

  • rimtnbiker

    Don’t you people talking about the Nissan Juke agree that Nissan should have licensed this vehicle to SAAB. A small all wheel drive vehicle is exactly what that company needs, and the Juke even looks like it could be a SAAB to my eye.

  • goat

    I really like it in red! Looking forward to driving an All4 model or at least seeing a MF review of the All4 production-spec car.

    One question for Gabe – did the much greater width of this compared with r5x feel good / bad / odd in the city? On the highway?

  • SFRedMCc

    The overall design of the Juke really is a “joke”. Maybe that’s the origin of its unusual name.

    The front end is absolutely horrendous.

  • Trout

    After seeing the red, blue, and black countrymen in person, I think black looks best. I think it is slimming. The red I did not like at all. The blue wasn’t bad, just not something I’d pick.

    And I can confirm the top speed of the black one. It passed me somewhere between Columbus and Indy while I was going… lets just say “fast”

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=697585298 David See

    Can the trunk badge be any MORE gigantic?

    If I were to buy this over-stuffed MINI, the first tool out would be a heat gun and a screwdriver to remove that thing!

    Better than I originally expected, but I still see a MINI as being a small, fun, economical automobile. Sorry.

  • http://www.motoringfile.com/ Gabe

    It’s the handle:

    _DSC0053

  • grueinthebox

    Can’t wait to see what it looks like lowered…

    Wish they were built in the UK – a MINI being built in Austria just ain’t right.

  • SteveR

    I have to disagree with the sunshiney-happy thrust of this blog write-up. Many things here are contradictory, incorrect, and just aren’t making sense…

    “The Countryman’s slightly slower steering and better on center control easily make it the best MINI on the highway I’ve ever driven.”

    Why would you applaud that feature? The original Alec Issignosis design paradigm of the MINI as a light, maneuverable MINI-car keeps getting shredded worse and worse. Slow steering and excessive suspension toe-in are the antithesis of a maneuverable chassis configuration.

    “And sitting a little higher for better visibility…”

    Like a minivan. See above. Also note self-perpetutation problem… if you’re having trouble seeing over the car in front of you because it’s too high, raising your car makes the same problem for the person behind you, so they must raise their car. You see where this leads.

    “The biggest upgrade on the transmission side is the entirely new clutch that is now self adjusting that gives you more consistent pedal feel. “

    So you think this is an “new upgrade”, huh? Apparently you’re not following the reports of the same self adjusting clutch that BMW has been using since 1999 that has been a total nightmare – the feel is worse than a normal clutch, and reliability is cut in half. When the dealer tells you your clutch is burnt out at 35K miles, tell him it’s on his dime.

    “That combined with a new dual mass flywheel (on all Cooper S models) and carbon shift cables gives the MCS more feel and better longevity.”

    The BMW-built MINI has always had a dual mass flywheel (another performance negative). Longevity is a rated 75K miles. What’s the lifespan of a conventional single-mass flywheel? LIFETIME. Where’s the better longevity?

    “Built in Austria at the plant that has made some of BMW’s highest quality products…”

    BMW’s highest quality products come from Dingolfing in Bavaria. The Austrian plant primarily produces their economy engines. It’s a good plant, but it’s just a plant, not a selling feature.

    If this seems like a negative tirade, you’re reading well. The MINI has been a disappointment to BMW owners looking for something small and fun, a lost opportunity for BMW to create an economical and efficient model range (it’s expensive and not frugal on fuel), and creates it’s own market with people that haven’t noticed these things, blinded by the “irreverent” styling (which is rapidly becoming very Toyota/Scion-like).

    The original Mini (without the need for attention-grabbing all-caps) was a game-changer. The new MINI is a me-too mini-GM with slightly tweaked models trying to be sedans, crossovers, who knows what else to come. So many other models from BMW’s own lineup do all these things better, drive better, and have better engines. Not to mention other manufacturers. Want to find the spirit of the original Mini? It’s in a Suzuki SX4 at the low end, a BMW 128i at the high end.

    Who am I? BMW service professional, track day enthusiast, and past MINI owner.

  • http://www.motoringfile.com/ Gabe

    “The Countryman’s slightly slower steering and better on center control easily make it the best MINI on the highway I’ve ever driven. “Why would you applaud that feature? The original Alec Issignosis design paradigm of the MINI as a light, maneuverable MINI-car keeps getting shredded worse and worse. Slow steering and excessive suspension toe-in are the antithesis of a maneuverable chassis configuration.

    It’s probably time to realize things have moved on a bit since 1958. There’s little question that MINI has catered to the publics’ desires since the 2001 launch of the R50 and with this move into a new category MINI has taken the successful formula and altered it slightly for a different need. And it’s not like your driving a Jeep Compass. As I’ve mentioned the car still has eager turn-in and a well sorted suspension for a mass produced product.

    “The biggest upgrade on the transmission side is the entirely new clutch that is now self adjusting that gives you more consistent pedal feel. “ So you think this is an “new upgrade”, huh? Apparently you’re not following the reports of the same self adjusting clutch that BMW has been using since 1999 that has been a total nightmare – the feel is worse than a normal clutch, and reliability is cut in half. When the dealer tells you your clutch is burnt out at 35K miles, tell him it’s on his dime.

    This is a new clutch. And having driven many BMWs before and after ’99 I can tell you that some lost feel and others did not. Compare the clutch feel of a 330i to a 330i with the ZHP package for instance.

    “That combined with a new dual mass flywheel (on all Cooper S models) and carbon shift cables gives the MCS more feel and better longevity.” The BMW-built MINI has always had a dual mass flywheel (another performance negative). Longevity is a rated 75K miles. What’s the lifespan of a conventional single-mass flywheel? LIFETIME. Where’s the better longevity?

    Again the key word here is “new”. This is a new dual mass flywheel meant to address several issues.

    “Built in Austria at the plant that has made some of BMW’s highest quality products…” BMW’s highest quality products come from Dingolfing in Bavaria. The Austrian plant primarily produces their economy engines. It’s a good plant, but it’s just a plant, not a selling feature.

    As we’ve reported previously the Countryman is being made by Magna Steyr in the same plant where the X3 was produced. And as most (inside and outside BMW) know, the X3 has traditionally been the highest quality product produced by BMW over the last 7 years.

    Want to find the spirit of the original Mini? It’s in a Suzuki SX4 at the low end, a BMW 128i at the high end.

    I want to believe you but having driven an SX4 I can safely say that it’s a low-rent marshmallow of a car with little redeeming featuring other than the packaging. The 128i is a fine car but not really set-up to be the kind of car you elude to without some suspension modification.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=157700491 Ronald Campbell

    As a family man Gabe, do you think you could easily put a kid in and out of it? And, do you think there is enough room for 3 people to do a road trip in it? Can someone actually fit in the backseat and be comfortable for a couple of hours? Thanks!

  • KipperFillets

    Having crawled over one of these in the showroom, I must admit I was very impressed. I’ve a test drive next month which will be the decider though.

    There certainly is enough room in the back for 2 large adults, with plenty of leg and head room. The fact that the rear seats slide backwards and forwards makes it even more versatile.

    My wife and I both loved the design and build quality, certainly compared to my R53. The only drawback for a day-to-day perspective was the lack of storage space. The door pockets are really small and awkward to access, the glove box is tiny and there’s no cubby-hole by the driver’s knee like in my R53, to put sunglasses, etc. The armrest doesn’t really address this issue.

    Being a bit of a crossover, I’d have thought some more utilitarian aspects would have been added – most small people carriers and 4×4′s push the “1000 places to store maps and stuff”.

    Like many people, I’ll be upgrading from the MINI hatch to something just that bit bigger so it’s easier to take a growing family out and about. Unfortunately it is bigger, as long as you don’t mind all the extra kit sliding about everywhere!

  • goat

    @ SteveR – good contribution, respectfully written.

    I lie somewhere in the middle… agree that BMW is taking the MINI brand in a very different directions but not all aspects of this direction are bad. Also, as I think is implied in the review, the R60 should be compared to what other compact crossovers are like today, and compared to those, it is happily more “mini-like” than any of them.

    Still, I agree very much with what I read as the “essence” of your post: when relativism is adopted too eagerly by both manufacturers and car reviewers, the products suffer. You end up having to choose “the best of the worst”.

    For people just entering the MINI world, or looking for a larger / more practical car but want it from the MINI brand, the current lineup is a driving revelation compared to most other new cars currently for sale. But, on the other hand, with a more historically-informed perspective (i.e., comparing the cars to the simplicity and genius packaging of classic minis or the more raw sporting feel of the first-gen BMW MINI), a less-favourable picture emerges.

  • SteveR

    Gabe wrote: “It’s probably time to realize things have moved on a bit since 1958. There’s little question that MINI has catered to the publics’ desires since the 2001 launch of the R50…”

    Isn’t that a “chicken or egg” mistake? If a company is launching something brand-new, it’s not catering to public desires. The launch of the MINI, and I was there for that at the dealership, was ballyhooed as the re-birth of the original Mini. While we realize that duplicating a 1958 box that would fit in the back of a Chevy Suburban is not realistic in our modern world of safety standards and larger people, my point remains; BMW was banking on the idea of the Mini to sell the MINI. The execution was, in effect, the 1995-1999 318ti without the RWD handling and with a full-bore marketing campaign. In effect, and no offense meant, we got a stylized Honda Civic (although the reliability was never matched, of course – may I list the many superchargers and head gaskets I’ve replaced?).

    Gabe wrote: “This is a new clutch. And having driven many BMWs before and after ‘99 I can tell you that some lost feel and others did not. Compare the clutch feel of a 330i to a 330i with the ZHP package for instance.”

    Gabe, there’s no difference between a regular 330i and 330i ZHP clutch. Check with your local BMW dealer – exact same part. Mechanical differences in the ZHP covered many aspects of the car, but definitely not the clutch. Those self adjusting clutches are a cash cow for the service department. Worst piece of technology ever in a BMW or MINI drivetrain.

    If you felt a difference between the clutches of two 330i, then you have proven my point. As the self adjuster goes bad, clutch feel changes dramatically. Drive two different MINIs and you might experience the same thing.

    Gabe wrote: “I want to believe you but having driven an SX4 I can safely say that it’s a low-rent marshmallow of a car with little redeeming featuring other than the packaging.”

    As is a base MINI. I wouldn’t own a Suzuki (decent cars, just not my style), but the SX4 Sport compares more favorably in the sporty department when looking at a Cooper S. Let’s make sure we’re comparing apples to apples or marshmallows to marshmallows here!

    Gabe wrote: “The 128i is a fine car but not really set-up to be the kind of car you elude (sic – allude is to reference, elude is to escape) to without some suspension modification.”

    Also as above. A 128i Sport or M-Sport tromps the best MINI in any handling comparison. Ratchet that up to a 135i and we have very little to talk about.

    The cutesy coupe (or sedan) market is rife with alternates beyond those two. The difference is the other brands don’t send out cardboard cutouts and stickers of your car.

    My gripe with MINI is that BMW has lost it’s way. They are not providing the product that MINI purports to be, and they are limiting US models in the BMW line to create artificial elimination of internal competition. Why can’t we get the 1-series hatch or wagon? Because when one of those is parked next to a MINI, the MINI does not get sold.

    For many of us, the 1-series feels like the apology for failing the MINI promise. Make mine a 135i M-Sport and I’ll see you guys on the road!

  • Captain

    Not a 1 to 1 relationship, but I recall those calling out the Apple iPad as an over inflated iPod Touch, yet that turned out to be a huge success for Apple (to date). Let’s see how the market responds to the Countryman.

    Of course, the iPad was the first to market with a tablet, MINI is coming in very late to the SUV/Crossover party.

    The counter-point example here could be the iPhone, Apple was very late to the cellphone/smartphone market, but the iPhone was so well executed… Ultimately the product should stand on its own and if the Countryman is deserving, the accolades and revenue will follow.

  • JonPD

    I got the chance to spend some time with the Countryman over several stops of MTTS 2010. I can say that I expect to see MINI sell many of these. The design is quite stellar and in person the car does look like it belongs in the MINI family. Still not a big fan of the development but I can say that it does make good sense.

    One of the highlights was speaking to Gert, Vinnie, and Jim about the car. Each had very valid and thoughtful insights that I listened to carefully. Gert had to be the best as I could see the happiness beaming from his face while he was setting back listening to the input from the great many people that were carefully checking it out. I stood around and just listened to people talk about the car and can say that generally speaking it seems that is has many people excited.

    It should be interesting to watch the sales and I for one hope that it does well to add more profit for MINI. This in end helping them develop a car for the performance crowd.

  • SteveR

    Captain – Apple made the first tablet? Really? http://www.google.com/search?q=tablet+computers+history

    Funny you mention Apple i-Products. Similar pretty face, weak personality issue.

    I so wanted to like the iPhone… except they are terrible at being just phones. I so wanted to like the iPad… except they’re so bad at being computers. Make my package a Droid and either a netbook or Kindle2.

    More “brand cult” success is not what discerning customers really want, it’s what fashion victims buy when told to. If we keep buying the dreck that manufacturers think we should want, then we deserve what we get instead of getting what we want.

  • Dave MacMini

    SteveR, you have just revealed your bias. The iPhone is a fine phone for most of us. The iPad is not intended to be a replacement for a computer. The MINI is not supposed to be a 1 series. In fact, I have driven a 128 and while it was OK, it is not a MINI, and it is UGLY! I would not put one in my driveway, but I am on my 4th MINI. I will certainly look closely at the Countryman, although it might not be the car for me. I rather like our new Camden, even though it is a Cooper, not an S. Heck, my wife even likes the Mission Control! And, we will continue to use our 2 iPhones and 4 Apple computers, and will likely stay in the MINI fold.

  • http://www.motoringfile.com/ Gabe

    SteveR, you have just revealed your bias.

    Yup. No point in hashing this out now :) The funny thing is that SteveR and I agree (under the surface) on a lot of things. I just come to different conclusions and have a glass half full view.

  • SteveR

    Bias? Dave, I like stuff to work. Yeah, Macs “just work” until they break, and they do like any other computer, and your AppleCare warranty replaces it… because you paid 3X as much as the same hardware sans “i”. And no, I don’t use Windows either, because that certainly doesn’t work.

    Sorry if I made hamburger out of your holy cow, that’s clearly your bias.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1652301258 Chuck Moss

    Any idea if NorthEast dealers are negotiating anything off dealer invoice or msrp on the Countryman S, non all wheel drive?

    Thanks


Sort by MINI model

MotoringFile on Instagram








MINI Model Cheat Sheet

1st Gen MINI
R50: One & MC Hatch
R52: All 1st Gen MINI Convt.
R53: MCS Hatch
2nd Gen MINI
R55: Clubman
R56: Hatch
R57: Convertible
R58: Coupe
R59: Roadster
R60: MINI Crossover
R61: MINI Crossover Coupe
3rd Gen MINI
F54: Clubman
F55: Five Door Hatch
F56: Hatch
F57: Convertible
F60: MINI Crossover
F58: Traveller

Advertise with MotoringFile

If you or your company are interested in advertising on the most influential MINI website in the world, please visit our Advertising section. If you have further questions about becoming a sponsor or would like to see our rate sheet please feel free to contact us directly.
mini mini
Translate MotoringFile with Google: 
 

BF

MotoringFile Buyers Guides

R50 ('02-'06 MC) Buyers Guide
R53 ('02-'06 MCS) Buyers Guide

BF

SF



MotoringFile Reviews

Reviews:
'12 JCW Coupe
'11 Fiat 500 Sport
'11 Tesla Roaster 2.5 '11 Countryman Comparo
'11 Cooper S Hatch
'11 Countryman MCS (FWD)
'11 Countryman MC (auto)
'10 Mayfair MCS (auto)
'11 Countryman MCS (ALL4)
'10 MINI E
'10 Tesla Roadster Sport
'09 Cooper S Convertible
'09 JCW Hatch
'09 JCW Clubman
JCW Stage I vs JCW Stage II
'08 Clubman S (Auto)
1st Drive: '08 MINI Clubman
'08 Smart Fourtwo
Comparison: '08 BMW 135i
'06 R53 MCS vs '07 R56 MCS
'07 R56 JCW (Stage 1)
'07 MINI Cooper S Long Term
'07 BMW Z4 M Coupe
'07 MINI Cooper & Cooper S
Audio: '07 MC/MCS at the Track
'06 JCW GP Long term
Reader Review: JCW GP
'06 JCW Cooper S Long Term
Comparison: '06 Lotus Elise
Comparison: '06 Mazda MX5
Comparison: '06 UK Focus ST
Comparison: '06 Civic Si
Comparison: '04 TVR T350
Comparison: '06 Nissan 350z
Comparison: '06 VW GTI w/DSG
Podcast: Cooper S Auto
Podcast: BMW 325i
Podcast: JCW MC Soundkit
'04 JCW MINI Cooper Tuning Kit
'05 MCS: One Month Review
'05 MCS Auto
'05 JCW S 1st Drive
'05 MINI Cooper
'05 MCS Conv. Long Term
'05 MINI Cooper S
'05 MCS Cabrio 1st Drive
'04 JCW MCS First Drive
'04 MC w/JCW Tuning Kit
BMW M3 SMG Vs. MCS
'04 MINI Cooper CVT
'02 MCS 3 year Review
Autocrossing the MINI Range


cafepress